Guide to Brussels Sprouts - Cooking Light

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*What's in Season?*

Winter, spring, summer, and fall each offer their own unique fruits and
vegetables for distinct seasonal flavor. Learn to choose and use each
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** Guide to Brussels Sprouts **

*This vegetable has a reputation for bitterness, but when properly cooked,
sprouts offer complex flavor with a subtle crunch.*

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Brussels Sprouts

Photo: Oxmoor House

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· Our Best Brussels Sprouts RecipesBrussels Sprouts Recipes

Don’t want to eat your Brussels sprouts? Here are 24 recipes that will
make them irresistibly good.

*more*

*SEASON:* Although readily available almost year-round, the peak season is
from September to mid-February.

*CHOOSING:* The best-tasting, most tender sprouts are only 1 to 11⁄2
inches in diameter—the smaller the


Source: www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/in-season-brussels-sprouts-00400000001701/


when are brussel sprouts in season


Brussels sprout - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Brussels sprout **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the plant. For the pencil game, see Sprouts
(game)#Brussels Sprouts.

Brussels sprout
Brussels sprout closeup.jpg
Brussels sprouts, cultivar unknown
Details
Species /Brassica oleracea/
Cultivar group Gemmifera group
Origin Low Countries, year unknown
Cultivar group members Cabbage

Brussels sprouts, raw (edible parts)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 179 kJ (43 kcal)
Carbohydrates 8.95 g
- Sugars 2.2 g
- Dietary fibre 3.8 g
Fat 0.3 g
Protein 3.38 g
Vitamin A equiv. 38 μg (5%)
- beta-carotene 450 μg (4%)
- lutein and zeaxanthin 1590 μg
Thiamine (vit. B[1]) 0.139 mg (12%)
Riboflavin (vit. B[2]) 0.09 mg (8%)
Niacin (vit. B[3]) 0.745 mg (5%)
Pantothenic acid (B[5]) 0.309 mg (6%)
Vitamin B[6] 0.219 mg (17%)
Folate (vit. B[9]) 61 μg (15%)
Choline 19.1 mg (4%)
Vitamin C 85 mg (102%)
Vitamin E 0.88 mg (6%)
Vitamin K 177 μg (169%)
Calcium 42 mg (4%)
Iron 1.4 mg (11%)
Magnesium 23 mg (6%)
Manganese 0.337 mg (16%)
Phosphorus 69 mg (10%)
Potassium 389 mg (8%)
Sodium 25 mg (2%)
Zinc 0.42 mg (4%)
Link to USDA Database entry
Percentages are relative to
US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

The *Brussels sprout* is a cultivar in the Gemmifera group of cabbages
(/Brassica oleracea/), grown for its edible buds. The leafy green
vegetables are typically 2.5–4 cm (0.98–1.6 in) in diameter and
look like miniature cabbages. The Brussels sprout has long been popular in
Brussels, Belgium, and may have originated there.^[1]

*Contents*

· 1 Cultivation

· 1.1 Europe
· 1.2 North America

· 2 Nutritional and medicinal


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brussels_sprout

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