Female genital mutilation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Female genital mutilation **

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"FGM" redirects here. For other uses, see FGM (disambiguation).

Billboard with surgical tools covered by a red X. Sign reads: STOP FEMALE
CIRCUMCISION. IT IS DANGEROUS TO WOMEN'S HEALTH. FAMILY PLANNING
ASSOCIATION OF UGANDARoad sign near Kapchorwa, Uganda, 2004
Definition Defined in 1997 by the WHO, UNICEF and UNFPA as the "partial or
total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the
female genital organs for non-medical reasons."^[1]
Areas Estimated in 2013 to be most common in 27 countries in Africa, as
well as in Yemen and Iraqi Kurdistan^[2]
Numbers 133 million in those countries as of 2014^[3]
Age Days after birth to puberty^[4]
Prevalence
Ages 15–49
Source: UNICEF, November 2014^[5]

· Somalia (98%)
· Guinea (97%)
· Djibouti (93%)
· Egypt (91%)
· Sierra Leone (90%)
· Mali (89%)
· Sudan (88%)
· Eritrea (83%)
· Gambia (76%)
· Burkina Faso (76%)
· Ethiopia (74%)
· Mauritania (69%)
· Liberia (66%)
· Guinea-Bissau (50%)




· Chad (44%)
· Côte d'Ivoire (38%)
· Kenya (27%)
· Senegal (26%)
· Nigeria (25%)
· Central African Republic (24%)
· Yemen (19%)
· United Republic of Tanzania (15%)
· Iraq (8%)
· Benin (7%)
· Togo (4%)
· Ghana (4%)
· Niger (2%)
· Uganda (1%)
· Cameroon (1%)

Ages 0–14
Source: UNICEF, November 2014^[5]

· Mali (74%)
· Gambia (56%)
· Mauritania (54%)
· Djibouti (49%)
· Guinea (46%)
· Somalia (46%)
· Guinea-Bissau (39%)
· Sudan (37%)
· Eritrea (33%)
· Ethiopia (24%)




· Chad (18%)
· Senegal (18%)
· Egypt (17%)
· Nigeria (17%)
· Yemen (15%)
· Burkina Faso (13%)


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_genital_mutilation

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