Alcoholics Anonymous : INFORMATION ON A.A.

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Welcome To Alcoholics Anonymous

INFORMATION ON A.A. FOR THE MEDIA IS A.A. FOR YOU? FOR GROUPS AND
MEMBERS ARCHIVES AND HISTORY HOW TO FIND A.A. MEETINGS

NAVIGATE TO VITAL INFO HIGHLIGHTS GSB/AAWS Calendar A.A.
LITERATURE VIDEOS AND AUDIOS

How to Find A.A. Meetings

A.A. Fact File

Big Book

Central Offices/Intergroups

Information on A.A.

Is A.A. for You?

A.A. Timeline - Over 70 Years of Growth

A.A. Guidelines Internet

G.S.O. and A.A.W.S. Calendar of Events

Books

eBooks

Pamphlets

Miscellaneous

Box 4-5-9 - News and Notes from G.S.O.

A.A. Guidelines

Newsletters

Service Material

A.A. Literature Updates

Ordering A.A. Literature

VHS/DVD

Audio Cassettes/CDs

American Sign Language




· WHAT A.A. IS AND IS NOT
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This is A.A.
A Brief Guide to Alcoholics Anonymous
A.A. At A Glance
Information on Alcoholics Anonymous
Problems other than Alcohol

· MORE INFORMATION FOR PROFESSIONALS
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Information For Professionals
About A.A. - Newsletter for Professionals
A.A. as a Resource for the Health Care Professional
A.A. as a Resource for Drug & Alcohol Court Professionals
A Message to Correctional Professionals
Members of the Clergy Ask About Alcoholics Anonymous
Is There an Alcoholic in the Workplace?
If You Are a Professional, A.A. Wants to Work With You
Anonymity Letter to Media
Request Information by Mail

· A.A. VIDEOS FOR PROFESSIONALS
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A.A. Video for Healthcare Professionals
A.A. Video for Legal and Corrections Professionals
A.A. Video for Employment/Human Resources Professionals

· FOR THE FAMILY
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Is There an Alcoholic in Your Life?

· CONTACTING THE GENERAL SERVICE OFFICE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION



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Source: www.aa.org/subpage.cfm


what is aa


Alcoholics Anonymous - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Alcoholics Anonymous **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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AA meeting sign

*Alcoholics Anonymous* (*AA*) is an international mutual aid fellowship
founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (Bill W. and Dr. Bob) in
Akron, Ohio. AA states that its "primary purpose is to stay sober and help
other alcoholics achieve sobriety".^[1]^[2]^[3] With other early members
Wilson and Smith developed AA's Twelve Step program of spiritual and
character development. AA's Twelve Traditions were introduced in 1946 to
help AA stabilize and grow. The Traditions recommend that members and
groups remain anonymous in public media, altruistically help other
alcoholics, including all who wish to stop drinking, and do not affiliate
AA with any other organization. The Traditions also recommend that AA
members acting on behalf of the fellowship steer clear of dogma, governing
hierarchies and involvement in public issues. Subsequent fellowships such
as Narcotics Anonymous have adopted and adapted the Twelve Steps and the
Twelve Traditions to their respective primary purposes.^[4]^[5]

AA has no opinion on the medical nature of alcoholism; nonetheless AA is
regarded, by many, as a proponent and popularizer of the disease theory of
alcoholism.^[4]^[6]^[7]^[8] AA is credited with helping many alcoholics
achieve and maintain sobriety.^[9] The American Psychiatric Association has
recommended sustained treatment in conjunction with AA's program, or
similar community resources, for chronic alcoholics unresponsive to brief
treatment.^[10] AA's data show that 36% are still attending AA a year after
their first meetings.^[11]^[12]

The first female member Florence Rankin joined AA in March 1937,^[13]^[14]
and the first non-Protestant member, a Roman Catholic, joined in 1939.^[15]
AA membership has since spread "across diverse cultures holding different
beliefs and values", including geopolitical areas resistant to


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholics_Anonymous

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