The Abstract Noun
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** The Abstract Noun **

Recognize an abstract noun when you see one.

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Nouns name people, places, and things. One class of nouns is /abstract/.
Your five senses cannot detect this group of nouns. You cannot /see/ them,
/hear/ them, / smell/ them, /taste/ them, or /feel/ them.

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Nothing to see! Nothing to hear! Nothing to smell! Nothing to
taste! Nothing to smell!
Cannot see Cannot hear Cannot smell Cannot taste Cannot touch

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Check out the following example:

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When Joseph dived into the violent waves to rescue a drowning puppy, his
bravery amazed the crowd of fishermen standing on the dock.

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Bravery, one of the nouns in this sentence, is an example of an abstract
noun. You can /see/ Joseph, the water, and the crowd. But you cannot see
bravery itself. Bravery has no color, size, shape, sound, odor, flavor, or
texture; it has no quality that you can see, hear, smell, taste, or touch.
Any noun that escapes your five senses is an abstract noun.

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Don't confuse an abstract noun with a concrete noun.

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Many nouns are /concrete/, not abstract. Concrete nouns register on your
five senses. Here is an example:

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Joseph cuddled the wet puppy under his warm jacket.

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Puppy is an example of a concrete noun. You can see a puppy, stroke its
fur, smell its breath, and listen to it whine. You can even taste the puppy
if you don't mind pulling dog hair off your tongue! Because a puppy will
register on all five senses, puppy is a concrete noun.

Look over this chart contrasting abstract and concrete nouns:

Abstract Nouns Concrete Nouns
deceit
dedication
curiosity
trust
relaxation
the President
teacher
cat
airplane
bubble bath


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Source: www.chompchomp.com/terms/abstractnoun.htm


what is a abstract noun


Noun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Noun **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Noun (disambiguation).

*Examples*
· The *cat* sat on the *mat*.
· Please hand in your *assignments* by the *end* of the *week*.
· *Cleanliness* is next to *godliness*.
· *Plato* was an influential *philosopher* in ancient *Greece*.
· Please complete this *assignment* with black or blue *pen* only, and
keep your *eyes* on your own *paper*.

A noun can co-occur with an article or an attributive adjective. Verbs and
adjectives can't. In the following, an asterisk (*) in front of an example
means that this example is ungrammatical.

1. *the name* (/name/ is a noun: can co-occur with a definite article
/the/.)
2. **the baptise* (/baptise/ is a verb: cannot co-occur with a definite
article.)
3. *constant circulation* (/circulation/ is a noun: can co-occur with the
attributive adjective /constant/.)
4. **constant circulate* (/circulate/ is a verb: cannot co-occur with the
attributive adjective /constant/.)
5. *a fright* (/fright/ is a noun: can co-occur with the indefinite article
/a/.)
6. **an afraid* (/afraid/ is an adjective: cannot co-occur with the article
/a/.)
7. *terrible fright* (The noun /fright/ can co-occur with the adjective
/terrible/.)
8. **terrible afraid* (The adjective /afraid/ cannot co-occur with the
adjective /terrible/.)

*Nouns* are a part of speech typically denoting a person, place, thing,
animal or idea. In linguistics, a noun is a member of a large, open lexical
category whose members can occur as the main word in the subject of a
clause, the object of a verb, or the object of a preposition.^[1]

Lexical categories are defined in terms of the ways in which their members
combine with other kinds of expressions. The syntactic


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noun

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