What are Blackheads? How to Get Rid of Blackheads

--------------------
Medical News Today
We have recently updated our Privacy Policy. Please click here to read
about how we use cookies. Close this window


Follow us on Facebook Google Plus Follow us on Twitter Our RSS feeds
Your MNT
login | register

· home
· opinions forum
· contact us
· news categories:
· a - b

· 1. Abortion
2. Acid Reflux / GERD
3. ADHD
4. Aid / Disasters
5. Alcohol / Addiction / Drugs
6. Allergy
7. Alternative Medicine
8. Alzheimer's / Dementia

1. Anxiety / Stress
2. Arthritis / Rheumatology
3. Asbestos / Mesothelioma
4. Asthma
5. Autism
6. Back Pain
7. Bio-terrorism / Terrorism
8. Biology / Biochemistry

1. Bipolar
2. Bird Flu / Avian Flu
3. Blood / Hematology
4. Body Aches
5. Bones / Orthopaedics
6. Breast Cancer
7.  
8.  

· c - d

· 1. Cancer / Oncology
2. Cardiovascular / Cardiology
3. Caregivers / Homecare
4. Cervical Cancer / HPV Vaccine
5. Cholesterol
6. CJD / vCJD / Mad Cow Disease
7. Cleft Palate
8. Clinical Trials / Drug Trials

1. Colorectal Cancer
2. Complementary Medicine
3. Compliance
4. Conferences
5. COPD
6. Cosmetic Medicine
7. Crohn's
8. Cystic Fibrosis

1. Dentistry
2. Depression
3. Dermatology
4. Diabetes
5. Drug Approvals
6. Dyslexia
7.  
8.  

· e - g

· 1. Ear, Nose and Throat
2. Eating Disorders
3. Eczema / Psoriasis
4. Endocrinology
5. Epilepsy

1. Erectile Dysfunction
2. Eye Health / Blindness
3. Fertility
4. Fibromyalgia
5. Flu / Cold / SARS

1. Food Intolerance
2. GastroIntestinal
3. Genetics
4. Gout
5. Gynecology

· h - l

· 1. Headache / Migraine
2. Health Insurance
3. Hearing / Deafness
4. Heart Disease
5. HIV / AIDS


Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/71615.php


what are blackheads


Comedo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

--------------------

** Comedo **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Blackhead" redirects here. For other uses, see Blackhead (disambiguation).

Blackhead
/Classification and external resources/

A male with blackheads on his nose
ICD-9 706.1

A *comedo* is a clogged hair follicle (pore) in the skin.^[1]Keratin (skin
debris) combines with oil to block the follicle.^[2] A comedo can be open
(*blackhead*) or closed by skin (whitehead), and occur with or without
acne.^[2] The word comedo comes from Latin to suggest the worm-like look of
a blackhead that has been secreted.^[3] The plural of comedo is
*comedones*.^[3]

The chronic inflammatory condition that usually includes both comedones and
inflamed papules and pustules (pimples or zits) is called acne.^[2]^[4]
Infection causes inflammation and the development of pus.^[1] Whether or
not a skin condition classifies as acne depends on the amount of comedones
and infection.^[4]

Comedo-type ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is not related to the skin
conditions discussed here. DCIS is a non-invasive form of breast cancer,
but comedo-type DCIS may be more aggressive and so may be more likely to
become invasive.^[5]

*Contents*

· 1 Causes
· 2 Pathophysiology
· 3 Management
· 4 Rare conditions
· 5 References

*Causes[edit]*

Oil production in the sebaceous glands increases during puberty, which is
why comedones and acne are so common in teenagers.^[2]^[4] Acne is also
more common pre-menstrually and in women with polycystic ovarian
syndrome.^[2] Smoking may worsen acne.^[2]

Poor hygiene is not a cause and the black in blackheads has nothing to do
with dirt.^[1] Washing or scrubbing the skin too much could make it worse,
by irritating the skin.^[1] Touching and picking at comedones might cause
irritation and spread infection


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comedo

© 2005-2018 HaveYourSay.org