Bitters - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Bitters **

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For other uses, see Bitter (disambiguation).


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An old (1823) bottle of bitters from Germany (Posen, now Poznań in
Poland).

A *bitters* is an alcoholic beverage flavored with herbal essences that has
a bitter or bittersweet flavor. Numerous brands of bitters were formerly
marketed as patent medicines, but are now considered to be digestifs rather
than medicines. They commonly have an alcoholic strength of 45% ABV and are
used as digestifs and flavorings in cocktails.

*Contents*

· 1 Ingredients
· 2 History
· 3 Digestive bitters
· 4 Cocktail bitters
· 5 Regionally available bitters
· 6 Nonalcoholic bitters
· 7 See also
· 8 References
· 9 External links

*Ingredients[edit]*

Common ingredients in bitters includes cascarilla, cassia, gentian, orange
peel, and quinine from cinchona bark (grown in Peru and Indonesia). The
flavor of Angostura bitters, Suze and Peychaud's Bitters derives primarily
from gentian, a bitter herb. Bitters are prepared by infusion or
distillation, using aromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their
flavor and medicinal properties.

In /Foundations of Health/, Christopher Hobbs, LAc, AHG lists angelica root
(/A. archangelica/), artichoke leaf (/Cynara scolymus/), bitter orange peel
(/Citrus aurantium/), blessed thistle leaves (/Cnicus bendicutus/), gentian
root (/Gentiana lutea/), goldenseal rhizome (/Hydrastis canadensis/),
wormwood


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitters


what are bitters

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