Is there any land on Jupiter or is it 100% gaseous? - Yahoo Answers

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zeek zeek

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** Is there any land on Jupiter or is it 100% gaseous? **

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dcno02 by dcno02


Source: answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090203224201AAAy6XD


Exploration of Jupiter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Exploration of Jupiter **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jupiter as seen by the space probe /Cassini/. This is the most detailed
global color portrait of Jupiter ever assembled.

The *exploration of Jupiter* has to date been conducted via close
observations by automated spacecraft. It began with the arrival of /Pioneer
10/ into the Jovian system in 1973, and, as of 2008^[update], has continued
with seven further spacecraft missions. All of these missions were
undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and
all save one have been flybys that take detailed observations without the
probe landing or entering orbit. These probes make Jupiter the most visited
of the Solar System's outer planets as all missions to the outer planets
must flyby Jupiter to increase the speed of the probe without needing an
excessive amount of fuel that will both be expensive and weigh it down.
Plans for more missions to the Jovian system are under development, none of
which are scheduled to arrive at the planet before 2016. Sending a craft to
Jupiter entails many technical difficulties, especially due to the probes'
large fuel requirements and the effects of the planet's harsh radiation
environment.

The first spacecraft to visit Jupiter was /Pioneer 10/ in 1973, followed a
few months later by /Pioneer 11/. Aside from taking the first close-up
pictures of the planet, the probes discovered its magnetosphere and its
largely fluid interior. The /Voyager 1/ and /Voyager 2/ probes visited
the planet in 1979, and studied its moons and the ring system, discovering
the volcanic activity of Io and the presence of water ice on the surface
of Europa. /Ulysses/ further studied Jupiter's magnetosphere in 1992 and
then again in 2000. The /Cassini/ probe approached the planet


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploration_of_Jupiter

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