Anguillidae - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Anguillidae **

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Anguillidae
Temporal range: Danian–0
PreЄ
Є
O
S
D
C
P
T
J
K
Pg
N

Early Paleocene (Danian) to Present^[1]
Anguillarostratakils.jpg
American eel, /Anguilla rostrata/
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Subclass: Neopterygii
Order: Anguilliformes
Suborder: Anguilloidei
Family: *Anguillidae*
Rafinesque, 1810
Genus: /*Anguilla*/
Garsault, 1764^[2]
Species
See text.

The *Anguillidae* are a family of ray-finned fish that contains the
*freshwater eels*. The nineteen species and six subspecies in this family
are all in the genus /*Anguilla*/. They are elongated fish with snake-like
bodies, their long dorsal, caudal and anal fins forming a continuous
fringe. They are catadromous fish, spending their adult lives in fresh
water but migrating to the ocean to spawn. Eels are an important food fish
and some species are now farm-raised but not bred in captivity. Many
populations in the wild are now threatened and Seafood Watch recommend
consumers avoid eating anguillid eels.

*Contents*

· 1 Characteristics
· 2 Uses
· 3 Species
· 4 References

*Characteristics[edit]*

Members of this family are catadromous, meaning they spend their lives in
freshwater rivers, lakes, or estuaries, and return to the ocean to
spawn.^[3] The young eel larvae, called leptocephali, live only in the
ocean and consume small particles called marine snow. They grow larger in
size, and in their next growth stage, they are called glass eels. At this
stage, they enter estuaries, and when they become pigmented, they are known
as elvers. Elvers travel upstream in freshwater rivers, where they grow to
adulthood. Some details of eel reproduction are as yet unknown, and the
discovery of the spawning area of the American and European eels in the
Sargasso Sea is one of the more


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anguillidae


is there freshwater eels

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