How is limestone formed? - Yahoo! UK & Ireland Answers

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** How is limestone formed? **

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how is limestone formed


Limestone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Limestone **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation).

Limestone
Sedimentary rock
Limestone Formation In Waitomo.jpg
Limestone in Waitomo District, New Zealand
Composition
Calcium carbonate: inorganic crystalline calcite and/or organic calcareous
material

*Limestone* is a sedimentary rock composed largely of the minerals calcite
and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate
(CaCO[3]). Many limestones are composed from skeletal fragments of marine
organisms such as coral or foraminifera.

Limestone makes up about 10% of the total volume of all sedimentary rocks.
The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst
landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions
of years. Most cave systems are through limestone bedrock.

Limestone has numerous uses: as a building material, as aggregate for the
base of roads, as white pigment or filler in products such as toothpaste or
paints, and as a chemical feedstock.

The first geologist to distinguish limestone from dolomite was Belsazar
Hacquet in 1778.^[1]

*Contents*

· 1 Description
· 2 Classification

· 2.1 Folk classification
· 2.2 Dunham classification

· 3 Limestone landscape
· 4 Uses
· 5 Gallery
· 6 See also
· 7 References
· 8 Further reading

*Description[edit]*

Limestone quarry at Cedar Creek, Virginia, USA
La Zaplaz formations in the Piatra Craiului Mountains, Romania.

Like most other sedimentary rocks, most limestone is composed of grains.
Most grains in limestone are skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as
coral or foraminifera. Other carbonate grains comprising limestones are
ooids, peloids, intraclasts, and extraclasts. These organisms secrete
shells made of aragonite or calcite, and leave these shells behind after
the organisms die.

Limestone often contains variable amounts of silica in the form of chert


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limestone

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