Iron Ore: Sedimentary Rock - Pictures, Definition & More

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Source: geology.com/rocks/iron-ore.shtml


how is iron ore formed


Iron ore - Wikipedia

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** Iron ore **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hematite: the main iron ore in Brazilian mines
This stockpile of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production.

*Iron ores*^[1] are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be
economically extracted. The ores are usually rich in iron oxides and vary
in color from dark grey, bright yellow, deep purple, to rusty red. The iron
itself is usually found in the form of magnetite (Fe
3O
4, 72.4% Fe), hematite (Fe
2O
3, 69.9% Fe), goethite (FeO(OH), 62.9% Fe), limonite (FeO(OH).n(H[2]O)) or
siderite (FeCO[3], 48.2% Fe).

Ores containing very high quantities of hematite or magnetite (greater than
~60% iron) are known as "natural ore" or "direct shipping ore", meaning
they can be fed directly into iron-making blast furnaces. Iron ore is the
raw material used to make pig iron, which is one of the main raw materials
to make steel. 98% of the mined iron ore is used to make steel.^[2] Indeed,
it has been argued that iron ore is "more integral to the global economy
than any other commodity, except perhaps oil".^[3]

*Contents*

· 1 Sources

· 1.1 Banded iron formations
· 1.2 Magnetite ores
· 1.3 Direct-shipping (hematite) ores
· 1.4 Magmatic magnetite ore deposits

· 2 Beneficiation

· 2.1 Magnetite
· 2.2 Hematite

· 3 Production and consumption

· 3.1 Iron ore market

· 4 Available iron ore resources

· 4.1 Available world iron ore resources
· 4.2 Australia

· 4.2.1 Pilbara deposit

· 5 Smelting

· 5.1 Trace elements

· 5.1.1 Silicon
· 5.1.2 Phosphorus
· 5.1.3 Aluminium
· 5


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_ore

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