How is fabric made and what is it made of? - Yahoo! Answers

--------------------

· Home
· Mail
· News
· Sports
· Finance
· Weather
· Games
· Groups
· Answers
· Flickr
· More

· omg!
· Shine
· Movies
· Music
· TV
· Health
· Shopping
· Travel
· Autos
· Homes

* Yahoo! Answers *

[INPUT][INPUT]

Sign In
Mail
/Help/

· Account Info
· Help
· Suggestions
· Send Feedback

Yahoo!

· Home
· Browse Categories

· Arts & Humanities
· Beauty & Style
· Business & Finance
· Cars & Transportation
· Computers & Internet
· Consumer Electronics
· Dining Out

· Education & Reference
· Entertainment & Music
· Environment
· Family & Relationships
· Food & Drink
· Games & Recreation
· Health

· Home & Garden
· Local Businesses
· News & Events
· Pets
· Politics & Government
· Pregnancy & Parenting

· Science & Mathematics
· Social Science
· Society & Culture
· Sports
· Travel
· Yahoo! Products

· My Activity

Sorry, you need to be Signed in to see this.

Not a member? Join Here.

· About

· How Answers Works
· Points & Levels
· Community Guidelines
· Leaderboard
· Suggestion Board
· Answers Blog

· *Ask*

What would you like to ask?

· *Answer*

· *Discover*

What are you looking for? Advanced Search

1. Home >
2. All Categories >
3. Beauty & Style >
4. Fashion & Accessories >
5. Resolved Question

Camille Camille

* Member since:
March 31, 2007
* Total points:
355 (Level 2)

· Add Contact
· Block

*Resolved Question*

Show me another »

** How is fabric made and what is it made of? **

you know, like fabric for clothes and stuff.

· 4 years ago
· Report Abuse


Source: answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090216221354AARJGiL


how is fabric made


Textile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

--------------------

** Textile **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation).
"Fabric" redirects here. For other uses, see Fabric (disambiguation).
Sunday textile market on the sidewalks of Karachi, Pakistan
Simple textile – magnified
A small fabric shop in Al-Mukalla, Yemen
Late antique textile, Egyptian, now in the Dumbarton Oaks collection.
Mrs. Condé Nast wearing one of the famous Fortuny tea gowns. This one
has no tunic but is finely pleated, in the Fortuny manner, and falls in
long lines, closely following the figure, to the floor.
Traditional Romanian table cloth, Maramureș.

A *textile*^[1] or *cloth*^[2] is a flexible woven material consisting of a
network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or
yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or
other material to produce long strands.^[3] Textiles are formed by weaving,
knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt).

The words *fabric* and *cloth* are used in textile assembly trades (such as
tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for /textile/. However, there are
subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. /Textile/ refers to
any material made of interlacing fibres. /Fabric/ refers to any material
made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may
be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). /Cloth/ may be
used synonymously with /fabric/ but often refers to a finished piece of
fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., /table cloth/).

*Contents*

· 1 Etymology
· 2 History
· 3 Uses
· 4 Fashion and textile designers
· 5 Sources and types

· 5.1 Animal textiles
· 5.2 Plant textiles
· 5.3 Mineral textiles
· 5.4 Synthetic textiles

· 6 Production methods
· 7 Treatments


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textile

© 2005-2018 HaveYourSay.org