How to make cotton candy - Bytesize Science - YouTube

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** How to make cotton candy - Bytesize Science **

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*Uploaded on 16 Aug 2011 *

So what is cotton candy? Watch as University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor
of Food Engineering Richard Hartel explains how to spin piping-hot melted
sugar into tasty threads, eventually cooling off


Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm6RcneM7kA


Cotton candy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Cotton candy **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Cotton candy
Cotton candy Μαλλί της γριάς.JPG
Spinning cotton candy at a funfair
Origin
Alternative name(s) Candy floss, fairy floss
Place of origin United States
Creator(s) William Morrison and John C. Wharton
Details
Type Confectionery
Main ingredient(s) Sugar, food coloring

"Candyfloss" redirects here. For the novel, see Candyfloss (novel). For
other uses, see Cotton candy (disambiguation).

*Cotton candy* (U.S., India, Canada), *candy floss*, or *candyfloss* (UK,
Ireland, New Zealand, India and South Africa), or *fairy floss* (Australia)
is a form of spun sugar. Since it comprises mostly air, a small initial
quantity of sugar generates a tremendously greater final volume, causing
servings to be physically large and voluminous. A typical serving on a
stick is approximately 1 ounce/30 grams. It is sometimes sold in bags
containing several servings (see accompanying photos).^[1]^[2]^[3] Cotton
candy is often served at carnivals or circuses. Food coloring can be used
to change the natural white color. There are many flavors, including
strawberry, lemonade, blueberry, lime, grape, orange, watermelon, pineapple
mango, and more. A similar confectionery is the Persian Pashmak, and the
Turkish Pişmaniye, although the latter is made with flour and water in
addition to sugar. Ngathrek Golop Lhakpa is also a Bhutanese variant, but
with added Butter tea and chilli peppers.

*Contents*

· 1 History
· 2 Production
· 3 Machines
· 4 Gallery
· 5 References
· 6 External links

*History[edit]*

Maple-flavored cotton candy at the cabane à sucre (sugar shack),
Pakenham, Canada

Cotton candy was first recorded in Europe in the 18th century.^[4] At that
time, spun sugar was an expensive, labor-intensive endeavor and was not
generally available to the average person.^[4] Machine-spun cotton candy
was


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton_candy

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