How do Bail Bonds work? - Yahoo! Answers

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Bud M Bud M

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** How do Bail Bonds work? **

My friend is in jail for being an idiot, he was able to call me from the
jail and gave me a


Source: answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090507092549AA7nnQ9


how do bail bonds work


Bail bondsman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Bail bondsman **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

*Contents*

· 1 History
· 2 Modern practice

· 2.1 Pricing
· 2.2 Recovery and bounty hunting
· 2.3 Alternatives and controversy

· 3 See also
· 4 References
· 5 Further reading
· 6 External links

A *bail bond agent*, or *bondsman*, is any person or corporation that will
act as a surety and pledge money or property as bail for the appearance of
persons accused in court. Although banks, insurance companies and other
similar institutions are usually the sureties on other types of contracts
(for example, to bond a contractor who is under a contractual obligation to
pay for the completion of a construction project) such entities are
reluctant to put their depositors' or policyholders' funds at the kind of
risk involved in posting a bail bond. Bail bond agents, on the other hand,
are usually in the business to cater to criminal defendants, often securing
their customers' release in just a few hours.

Bail bond agents are almost exclusively found in the United States and its
former commonwealth, the Philippines. In most other countries bail is
usually much less and the practice of bounty hunting is illegal.^[1] The
industry is represented by various trade associations, with the American
Bail Coalition forming an umbrella group in the United States.

*History[edit]*

The first modern bail bonds business in the US, the system by which a
person pays a percentage of the court-specified bail amount to a
professional bonds agent who puts up the cash as a guarantee that the
person will appear in court, was established by Tom and Peter P. McDonough
in San Francisco in 1898.^[/citation needed/]

*Modern practice[edit]*

Bond agents have


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bail_bondsman

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