how are porcelain tiles made


Porcelain tile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Porcelain tile **

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Hand-painted Chinese porcelain tiles on the floor of a Jewish synagogue in
Cochin, Kerala, India

*Porcelain tiles* are ceramic tiles commonly used to cover floors and
walls, with a water absorption rate of less than 0.5 percent. They can
either be glazed or unglazed.

*Contents*

· 1 History
· 2 Production
· 3 Polished Porcelain tiles
· 4 Use
· 5 Disadvantages of Porcelain
· 6 Adhesives
· 7 Sealing
· 8 References
· 9 See also

*History[edit]*

Although porcelain has been used for making tiles for many years, only
modern production methods and quantities has made the porcelain tile
available for the average householder in recent years.

*Production[edit]*

Large-scale production of porcelain tile is undertaken in many countries,
with the major producers being China, Italy, Spain and Turkey. There are
also countries undertaking small-scale production, such as Australia and
strong growth in Brazil.

The hardness of the tile can be rated from zero to five according to ISO
10545-7 (also, ASTM C1027) test for surface abrasion resistance of glazed
tile, and this can be used to determine suitability for various end use
conditions.

*Polished Porcelain tiles[edit]*

The dense, hard surface of porcelain has made polishing a viable
alternative to a glazed surface. This means that a tile can be fired, then
a polish cut into the surface, creating a shine without a glaze.

*Use[edit]*

Porcelain is much harder than ordinary ceramic tiles and is usually
selected, despite its higher price etc.porcelain can be used in dry areas
such as wall


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porcelain_tile

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