How are frequency and wavelength related?

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** Communications System **

-How does NASA communicate with spacecraft?-

*How are frequency and wavelength related?*

Electromagnetic waves always travel at the same speed (299,792 km per
second). This is one of their defining characteristics. In the
electromagnetic spectrum there are many different types of waves with
varying frequencies and wavelengths. They are all related by one important
equation: Any electromagnetic wave's frequency multiplied by its wavelength
equals the speed of light.

{{

*FREQUENCY OF OSCILLATION x WAVELENGTH = SPEED OF LIGHT*

}}

We can use this relationship to figure out the wavelength or frequency of
any electromagnetic wave if we have the other measurement. Just divide the
speed of light by whichever measurement you have and then you've got the
other.

{{


/Figure from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's publication: Basics of
Space Flight Learner's Workbook. http://www-b.jpl.nasa.gov/basics//

}}

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{{

What are radio waves?
What is frequency?
How is data put on radio waves?
*Is there energy in space?*

}}

{{

How does reflection affect radio waves?
More about radio waves.
What is electromagnetic radiation?

}}

{{

What radio frequency does DS1 use for communications?
How do you make a radio wave?
What makes EM radiation?

}}

//

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Source: www.qrg.northwestern.edu/projects/vss/docs/communications/2-how-are-frequency-and-wavelength-related.html


how are frequency and wavelength related


Wavelength - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Wavelength **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Wavelength (disambiguation).
Wavelength of a sine wave, λ, can be measured between any two points
with the same phase, such as between crests, or troughs, or corresponding
zero crossings as shown.

In physics, the *wavelength* of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of
the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats.^[1] It is
usually determined by considering the distance between consecutive
corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests, troughs, or zero
crossings, and is a characteristic of both traveling waves and standing
waves, as well as other spatial wave patterns.^[2]^[3] Wavelength is
commonly designated by the Greek letter /lambda/ (λ). The concept can
also be applied to periodic waves of non-sinusoidal shape.^[1]^[4] The term
/wavelength/ is also sometimes applied to modulated waves, and to the
sinusoidal envelopes of modulated waves or waves formed by interference of
several sinusoids.^[5] The SI unit of wavelength is the meter.

Assuming a sinusoidal wave moving at a fixed wave speed, wavelength is
inversely proportional to frequency: waves with higher frequencies have
shorter wavelengths, and lower frequencies have longer wavelengths.^[6]

Examples of wave-like phenomena are sound waves, light, and water waves. A
sound wave is a variation in air pressure, while in light and other
electromagnetic radiation the strength of the electric and the magnetic
field vary. Water waves are variations in the height of a body of water. In
a crystal lattice vibration, atomic positions vary.

Wavelength is a measure of the distance between repetitions of a shape
feature such as peaks, valleys, or zero-crossings, not a measure of how far
any given particle moves. For example, in sinusoidal waves over deep


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wavelength

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