How are Flies Born? - Ask.com

--------------------

Ask a Question Q&A Articles

· Science
·
· Alternative
· Archaeology
· Astronomy
· Biological Sciences
· Chemistry
· Earth Sciences
· Ecology
· Engineering
· Environment
· Geology
· Mathematics
· Other
· Physics
· Scientific Equipment
· Scientific Institutions
· Technology

More

· Alternative
· Archaeology
· Astronomy
· Biological Sciences
· Chemistry
· Earth Sciences
· Ecology
· Engineering
· Environment
· Geology
· Mathematics
· Other
· Physics
· Scientific Equipment
· Scientific Institutions
· Technology

src="http://wzus1.ask.com/i/i.gif?t=v&d=us&s=usseo&c=qasp&ld=&app=seo&l=dir&o=102140&oo=102140&sv=7f000001&p=/question/how-are-flies-born"
height=1 width=1 id="SessionTracker" />

· Q&A
· > Science
· > Biological Sciences


Tweet
Email

** How are Flies Born? **

*Answer*

mjp65aa
Flies love decaying matter. It can be plants, but they love dead animals
even more. The female lays eggs on something that is rotting and the eggs
hatch into maggots. After about 5 to 7 days the maggot turns into a fly.
Yucky! You can find more information here:
http://www.badhonhara.com/Article_Body.php?Article_ID=907&Sub_Sub_Category_ID=169
1 Additional Answer
Dareth
Flies are born when the female lays eggs, and from the eggs come larva or
maggots. They usually stay in the maggot stage for about a week, before
becoming pupae, then flies.
';var horzlayout_suffix='
';var
adLabelText='';if(adLabelText==''||adLabelText=='Ad'||adLabelText=='Ads'){if((loc=='top'&&window['ad_config_top']==1)||(loc=='bottom'&&window['ad_config_bot']==1))
adLabelText="Ad" else adLabelText="Ads"}else{adLabelText='$spLabel'}
window['spLabel']=''+adLabelText+' ';var tp='top';if(loc=='bottom')
tp='bot' var wzPick="return pk(this,
{en:\'{en}\',io:\'{io}\',b:\'spl\',tp:\'"+tp+"\',ec:\'{ec}\',ex:\'\'});";var
pl=' onmousedown='+'\"'+""+wzPick+'\"';var vertical_layout='
{label}_{title}_
{abstract}
{visibleUrl}\n
\n';var horizontal_layout='
{label}{title}
{abstract}
{visibleUrl}\n
\n';if(layout=="horizontal"){s+=horzlayout_prefix;}else{s+=vertlayout_prefix;}
var padding;var ads=window['google_ads'];var
numGsl=Math.min(ads.length,num);var offset=0;var
end=numGsl;if(!false&&!top){start=window['ad_config_top'];end=Math.min(ads.length,4);}
if(false||top) var offset=0;else var offset=window['ad_config_top'];for(var
i=start;i3&&horizontal_bottom_ad_fix==2){fragment+=spLabel;}else
if(ec>3&&i==2){fragment+=spLabel;}else
if(ec";fragment=fragment.replace(/\{label\}/,"");} else{var
fragment=template;if(window['spLabel']&&false){fragment=fragment.replace(/\{label\}/,window['spLabel']);}
else
if(window['spLabel']&&(i==start)&&set==0){fragment=fragment.replace(/\{label\}/


Source: www.ask.com/question/how-are-flies-born


how are flies born


Housefly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

--------------------

** Housefly **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

/Not to be confused with horsefly./

Housefly

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Section: Schizophora
Family: Muscidae
Genus: /Musca/
Species: /*M. domestica*/
Binomial name
*/Musca domestica/*
Linnaeus, 1758
Subspecies
· /M. d. calleva/ Walker, 1849
· /M. d. domestica/ Linnaeus, 1758

The *housefly* (also *house fly*, *house-fly* or *common housefly*),
/*Musca domestica*/, is a fly of the suborder Cyclorrhapha. It is the most
common of all domestic flies, accounting for about 91% of all flies in
human habitations, and indeed one of the most widely distributed insects,
found all over the world. It is considered a pest that can carry serious
diseases.

*Contents*

· 1 Physical description
· 2 Life cycle
· 3 Sex determination
· 4 Evolution
· 5 Flies and humans

· 5.1 Housefly as a transmitter of disease
· 5.2 Potential in waste management

· 6 References
· 7 External links

*Physical description[edit]*

Question book-new.svg
This section *relies largely or entirely upon a single source*. Relevant
discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article
by introducing citations to additional sources. /(April 2012)/

A scan of a house fly under a scanning electron microscope.

The adults are about 5-8 mm long. Their thorax is gray, with four
longitudinal dark lines on the back. The whole body is covered with
hair-like projections. The females are slightly larger than the males, and
have a much larger space between their red compound eyes. The mass of pupae
can range from about 8 to 20 mg under different conditions.^[1]

Like other Diptera (meaning "two-winged"), houseflies have only one pair of
wings; the hind pair is reduced to small halteres that aid


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housefly

© 2005-2018 HaveYourSay.org