how are equinoxes and solstices different


Equinox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Equinox **

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This article is about the astronomical events wherein the sun crosses the
Celestial Equator and consequentially appears at the zenith over the
Earth's Equator. For other uses, see Equinox (disambiguation).
For the same event happening on other planets and setting up a celestial
coordinate system, see Equinox (celestial coordinates).

UT date and time of
*equinoxes* and solstices on Earth^[1]
event equinox solstice equinox solstice
month March June September December
year
day time day time day time day time
2010 20 17:32 21 11:28 23 03:09 21 23:38
2011 20 23:21 21 17:16 23 09:04 22 05:30
2012 20 05:14 20 23:09 22 14:49 21 11:12
2013 20 11:02 21 05:04 22 20:44 21 17:11
2014 20 16:57 21 10:51 23 02:29 21 23:03
2015 20 22:45 21 16:38 23 08:20 22 04:48
2016 20 04:30 20 22:34 22 14:21 21 10:44
2017 20 10:28 21 04:24 22 20:02 21 16:28
2018 20 16:15 21 10:07 23 01:54 21 22:23
2019 20 21:58 21 15:54 23 07:50 22 04:19
2020 20 03:50 20 21:44 22 13:31 21 10:02

An *equinox* occurs twice a year, around 21 March and 23 September. The
word itself has several related definitions. The oldest meaning is the day
when daytime and night are of approximately equal duration.^[2] The word
/equinox/ comes from this definition, derived from the Latin /aequus/
(equal) and /nox/ (night). The equinox is not exactly the same as the day
when period of daytime and night are of equal length for two reasons.
Firstly, sunrise, which begins daytime, occurs when the top of the Sun's
disk rises above the eastern horizon. At that instant, the disk's center is
still below the horizon. Secondly


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equinox

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