Over-the-counter cold remedies: what works, what doesn’t | Fox News

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Source: www.foxnews.com/health/2014/01/28/over-counter-cold-remedies-what-works-what-doesnt/


does zicam really work


Zicam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Zicam **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

*Zicam* is a branded series of products marketed for cold and allergy
relief whose original formulations included the element zinc. The Zicam
name is derived from a portmanteau of the words "zinc" and "ICAM-1" (the
receptor to which a rhinovirus binds in order to infect cells).^[/citation
needed/] It is labelled as an "unapproved homeopathic" product.^[1]

Zicam was invented by Robert S. Davidson and Charles B. Hensley in the mid
1990s and is produced, marketed and sold by Zicam, LLC, a wholly owned
subsidiary of Matrixx Initiatives, Inc.,^[2]^[3] an American
over-the-counter drug company. In 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) and Health Canada advised consumers to avoid
intranasal versions of Zicam Cold Remedy because of a risk of damage to the
sense of smell,^[4] leading the manufacturer to withdraw these versions
from the U.S. market.^[/citation needed/] The Zicam brand has been expanded
to include non-zinc formulations.^[/citation needed/]

*Contents*

· 1 Ingredients and use
· 2 Safety concerns

· 2.1 Litigation
· 2.2 NAD Claims
· 2.3 FDA warning and product recall

· 3 References
· 4 External links

*Ingredients and use[edit]*

The only biologically active ingredients present in Zicam Cold Remedy are
slightly diluted zinc acetate (2X = 1/100 dilution) and zinc gluconate (1X
= 1/10 dilution);^[1] the product's other originally active ingredients
have been serially diluted to the point that Zicam should no longer contain
any molecules of those ingredients, and are listed as "inactive
ingredients" on the label.^[1]

Zicam is marketed as a homeopathic product that can shorten the duration of
a cold and that may reduce the severity of common cold symptoms, like sore


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zicam

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