Does Enzyte really work? - Yahoo! Answers

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vajahar555 vajahar5...

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** Does Enzyte really work? **

Or Extenze or whatever? I mean, something that doesn't require a doctor's
prescription seems a little shady.

· 6 years ago
· Report Abuse

La Nutritionista by La Nutritionista

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Source: answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080106002010AA7VvrU


does enzyte really work


Enzyte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Enzyte **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

*Enzyte* is an herbal nutritional supplement originally manufactured by
Berkeley Premium Nutraceuticals (now Vianda, LLC) of Cincinnati, Ohio. The
manufacturer has claimed that Enzyte promotes "natural male enhancement,"
which is a euphemism for penile enlargement. However, its effectiveness has
been called into doubt and the claims of the manufacturer have been under
scrutiny from various state and federal organizations. Kenneth Goldberg,
M.D., medical director of the Male Health Center at Baylor University,
says, "It makes no sense medically. There's no way that increasing blood
flow to the penis, as Enzyte claims to do, will actually increase its
size."^[1]

In March 2005, following thousands of consumer complaints to the Better
Business Bureau, federal agents raided Berkeley facilities, gathering
material that resulted in a 112-count criminal indictment. The company's
founder and CEO, Steve Warshak, and his mother, Harriet Warshak, were found
guilty of conspiracy to commit mail fraud, bank fraud, and money
laundering, and in September 2008 they were sentenced to prison and ordered
to forfeit $500 million in assets.^[2] The convictions and fines forced
the company into bankruptcy, and in December 2008 its assets were sold for
$2.75 million to investment company Pristine Bay, which continued
operations.^[3]

By 2009, marketing was oriented to erectile dysfunction and attracting more
naive purchasers seeking permanent enlargement of the penis. Enzyte is
widely advertised on U.S. television as "the once daily tablet for natural
male enhancement." The commercials feature a character known as "Smilin'
Bob," who always wears a smile that is implied to be caused by the
enhancing effects of Enzyte; these advertisements feature double entendres.
Some commercials feature an equally smiling "Mrs. Bob."^[4]

Because Enzyte is


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzyte

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