Do insects feel pain when injured?

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** Do insects feel pain when injured? **

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Source: answers.yahoo.com/question/?qid=20070801132609AApKOZJ


can insects feel pain


Pain in animals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Pain in animals **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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A Galapagos shark hooked by a fishing boat

Pain is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as
"an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or
potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage."^[1]
However, for non-human animals, it is harder, if even possible, to know
whether an emotional experience has occurred.^[2] Therefore, this concept
is often excluded in definitions of *pain in animals*, such as that
provided by Zimmerman: "an aversive sensory experience caused by actual or
potential injury that elicits protective motor and vegetative reactions,
results in learned avoidance and may modify species-specific behaviour,
including social behaviour."^[3]

The standard measure of pain in humans is how a person reports that pain,
for example, on a pain scale). Only the person experiencing the pain can
know the pain's quality and intensity, and the degree of suffering. Animals
cannot report their feelings in the same manner as humans, but observation
of their behaviour provides a reasonable indication as to the extent of
their pain. Just as doctors and medics who sometimes share no common
language with their patients, the indicators of pain can still be
understood.

Physical pain is both an objective physiological process and a subjective
conscious experience. The physiological component usually involves the
transmission of a signal along a chain of nerve fibers from the site of a
noxious stimulus at the periphery to the spinal cord and brain. This
process may evoke a reflex response generated at the spinal cord and not
involving the brain, such as flinching or withdrawal of a limb, and it may
also involve brain activity, such as registering the


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pain_in_animals

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