Flying Fish, Flying Fish Pictures, Flying Fish Facts - National Geographic

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Source: animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/flying-fish/


are there flying fish


Flying fish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** Flying fish **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Flying fish (disambiguation).

Flying fish
Temporal range: Miocene–Recent
PreЄ
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Sailfin flying-fish
/Parexocoetus brachypterus/
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Beloniformes
Family: *Exocoetidae*
Genera
· /Cheilopogon/
· /Cypselurus/
· /Exocoetus/
· /Fodiator/
· /Hirundichthys/
· /Parexocoetus/
· /Prognichthys/

*Exocoetidae* is a family of marine fish in the order Beloniformes of class
Actinopterygii. Fish of this family are known as *flying fish*. There are
about sixty-four species grouped in seven to nine genera. Flying fish can
make powerful, self-propelled leaps out of water into air, where their
long, wing-like fins enable gliding flight for considerable distances above
the water's surface. This uncommon ability is a natural defense mechanism
to evade predators.

The oldest known fossil of a flying or gliding fish, /Potanichthys
xingyiensis/, dates back to the Middle Triassic, 235–242 million years
ago. However, this fossil is not related to modern flying fish, which
evolved independently about 65 million years ago.^[1]^[2]

*Contents*

· 1 Etymology
· 2 Distribution and description

· 2.1 Flight measurements

· 3 Fishery and cuisine
· 4 Importance

· 4.1 Barbados

· 4.1.1 Maritime disputes

· 5 See also
· 6 References
· 7 External links

*Etymology[edit]*

The term "Exocoetidae" is not only the present scientific name for a genus
of flying fish in this family, but also the general name in Latin for a
flying fish. The suffix /-idae/, common for indicating a family, follows
the root of the Latin word /exocoetus/, a transliteration of the Ancient
Greek name ἐξώκοιτος. This means literally
"sleeping outside", from ἔξω "outside" and
κοῖτος "bed", "resting place"


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_fish

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