Re: earthquakes in San Diego? (Santa Barbara, Palm Springs: tornado,

earthquake, living in) - City-Data Forum
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Unread 02-05-2007, 03:34 PM
SarahGabrielle SarahGabrielle started this thread
  43 posts, read 130,862 times
Reputation: 21

Question*Re: earthquakes in San Diego?*
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Are there a lot of earthquakes in San Diego as compared to San Fransisco?
San Diego seems less vulnerable to earthquakes. Is this true?
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Unread 02-05-2007, 08:23 PM
JakeDog
  1,794 posts, read 3,252,337 times
Reputation: 861

"San Diego seems less vulnerable to earthquakes. Is this true?"

It is, but that's no reason to be concerned about SF or anywhere in
Calfornia. The chances of getting killed/hurt by an earthquake are so small
it's like worrying about tidal waves in Nebraska.
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Unread 02-05-2007, 08:44 PM
SarahGabrielle SarahGabrielle started this thread
  43 posts, read 130,862 times
Reputation: 21

Default*Re: Do you live in LA?*
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What city do you live in?
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Source: www.city-data.com/forum/san-diego/42977-re-earthquakes-san-diego-santa-barbara.html


List of earthquakes in California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** List of earthquakes in California **

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The San Andreas Fault is the source of most of California's earthquakes.

*Earthquakes in California* are common occurrences since the state is
located on the San Andreas Fault, which cuts across California and forms
the tectonic boundary between the Pacific and the North American Plate.
There are many thousands of small earthquakes per year, most of them so
small that they are not felt.^[1] California's complex and interesting
landscape can be attributed to the network of faulting that runs underneath
the state. The earliest reported earthquake in California was felt in 1769
by the Portola expedition about 30 miles southeast of Los Angeles, probably
near the San Andreas Fault.^[2]^[3]

*Contents*

· 1 History and earthquake/region summaries
· 2 List of earthquakes
· 3 Preparedness
· 4 See also
· 5 References
· 6 External links

*History and earthquake/region summaries[edit]*

California has over 100 active faults throughout the state which are known
to produce large earthquakes. The most active fault is the San Jacinto
Fault in Southern California, which has produced large events on a regular
basis throughout recent history. The Mendocino Triple Junction located
offshore of Northern California is also very active, producing several
earthquakes above magnitude 7 throughout history.^[4] Northern California
is also subject to megathrust earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone
(extending north from Mendocino), such as the 1700 Cascadia earthquake,
magnitude of approximately 9. The town of Parkfield in central California
is located on a section of the San Andreas Fault that produces an
earthquake of about magnitude 6 every 20–30 years on average in 1857,
1881, 1901, 1922, 1934, 1966 and 2004.^[5]

The largest recorded


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_earthquakes_in_California

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