There are no atheists in foxholes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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** There are no atheists in foxholes **

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Brian Wansink of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab found that the more a
combat veteran disliked the war, the more religious they were 50 years
later

The statement "*There are no atheists in foxholes*" is an aphorism used to
argue that in times of extreme stress or fear, such as in war, all people
will believe in, or hope for, a higher power.^[1]

*Contents*

· 1 Origin
· 2 Usage
· 3 Notable counterexamples
· 4 References
· 5 External links

*Origin[edit]*

The origin of the quotation is uncertain.^[2] U. S. Military Chaplain
William Thomas Cummings may have said it in a field sermon during the
Battle of Bataan in 1942, though scholars have been unable to find a
firsthand witness.^[3] Other sources credit Lieutenant Colonel Warren J.
Clear, who was also at Bataan, or Lieutenant Colonel William Casey. But the
phrase is most often attributed to war correspondent Ernie
Pyle.^[4]^[5]^[6] It was also quoted by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in
remarks broadcast from the White House as part of a February 7, 1954,
American Legion Program. With slightly different wording, the statement
appears much earlier in press reports dating from the end of the First
World War, while a similar concept has been sought in Plato's /Laws/.^[2]

*Usage[edit]*

While primarily used to comment on the experiences of combat soldiers, the
aphorism has been adapted to other perilous situations, as in "There are no
atheists in Probate Court".^[7] Although the adage occasionally means that
all soldiers in combat are "converted" under fire, it is most often used to
express the belief of the speaker


Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_are_no_atheists_in_foxholes


are there atheists in foxholes

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